AB60 Driver’s License for Undocumented Immigrants

In 2015, California became the tenth state in the United States to allow undocumented immigrants to obtain a driver’s license through Assembly Bill 60 (AB 60). AB 60 was passed to increase public safety on California roads by ensuring that all drivers have passed a driving test and have auto insurance, regardless of their immigration status. The law has been a significant benefit for many undocumented immigrants in California, and here’s why.

Background of AB 60

Before the passage of AB 60, undocumented immigrants in California were not able to obtain driver’s licenses. This meant that they could not legally drive, making it difficult for them to get to work, school, or access essential services. Furthermore, many undocumented immigrants were also subject to deportation if they were stopped by law enforcement while driving without a license.

AB 60 addressed these issues by allowing undocumented immigrants to obtain a driver’s license in California. To be eligible for the license, applicants must provide proof of identity and residency in California and pass the standard California driver’s license test. The driver’s license issued under AB 60 is not a REAL ID-compliant license, and it cannot be used as identification to board a plane or enter a federal building.

Benefits of AB 60

The passage of AB 60 has had several significant benefits for undocumented immigrants in California. One of the most significant benefits is that it has allowed them to legally drive, making it easier for them to get to work, and school, and access essential services such as healthcare.

The driver’s license issued under AB 60 has also helped to increase public safety on California roads. By requiring that all drivers pass a driving test and have auto insurance, regardless of their immigration status, the law has helped to reduce the number of unlicensed and uninsured drivers on the road, which can contribute to higher rates of accidents.

AB 60 has also helped to reduce the fear of deportation for undocumented immigrants who may be stopped by law enforcement while driving. Previously, undocumented immigrants who were stopped by law enforcement while driving without a license were subject to deportation. However, with the passage of AB 60, undocumented immigrants who have a driver’s license are less likely to be deported for this reason.

Challenges of AB 60

While AB 60 has been a significant benefit for many undocumented immigrants in California, it has also faced some challenges. One of the challenges is that some law enforcement agencies have been slow to accept the driver’s license issued under AB 60 as a valid form of identification.

Another challenge is that some employers and businesses may not recognize the driver’s license issued under AB 60 as a valid form of identification. This can make it difficult for undocumented immigrants to access certain services or obtain employment.

Conclusion

The passage of AB 60 has been a significant benefit for many undocumented immigrants in California. The law has allowed them to legally drive, making it easier for them to get to work, and school, and access essential services. Additionally, the law has helped to increase public safety on California roads and reduce the fear of deportation for undocumented immigrants who may be stopped by law enforcement while driving. While there have been some challenges with the implementation of AB 60, overall, the law has been a significant step forward for undocumented immigrants in California.

Workers Compensation lawyer Roger Haag
About The Author

Roger Haag is an attorney who specializes in consumer, labor, and employment law, primarily representing employees. Mr. Haag has extensive experience in various legal proceedings, including arbitration hearings, administrative hearings, bench and jury trials, and has even presented arguments before the California Courts of Appeal. Additionally, Mr. Haag served in the United States Navy and also has professional experience with the Department of the Navy’s Civilian Acquisition Workforce and Chief of Naval Operations Executive Panel in Washington D.C.

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